Commit 7c1868f5 authored by al smith's avatar al smith 🏳️‍🌈
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fix typo contents.lr

parent d27dd642
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ This blog post explains what we're doing to detect malicious actors (and remove
Whether a relay is "bad" or "malicious" is often not as clear-cut as it might sound at first. Maybe the relay in question is just misconfigured and is, e.g., missing family settings (for the family configuration option see [section 5](https://community.torproject.org/relay/setup/post-install/) in our post-install instructions). Does that mean the operator has nefarious intentions? To help us react to those situations, we have [developed a set of criteria and a process](https://gitlab.torproject.org/tpo/network-health/team/-/wikis/Criteria-for-rejecting-bad-relays) for dealing with potentially bad relays. Now, when we get a report or detect suspicious behavior, we follow that process. First, we try to fix the underlying issue together with the operator, and if that does not work or the behavior is outright malicious, we propose the relay for rejection (or maybe assigning the `badexit` flag).
There is an important point here to be made about the process of removing relays from the network: while we do have staff who are watching the network and reviewing reports from volunteers, it is *not* Tor staff who reject relays (and that is by design). Instead, rejecting relays from the network is the job of the [directory authorities](https://support.torproject.org/glossary/directory-authority/). Directory authorities are special-purpose relays that maintain a list of currently-running relays and periodically publish a consensus together with the other directory authorities. Directory authorities are run mostly by trusted volunteers from our community. They rely on recommendations from the Network Health team to evaluate and address malicious relays, but only they only reject a potentially malicious relay if the majority of directory authorities agree to do so.
There is an important point here to be made about the process of removing relays from the network: while we do have staff who are watching the network and reviewing reports from volunteers, it is *not* Tor staff who reject relays (and that is by design). Instead, rejecting relays from the network is the job of the [directory authorities](https://support.torproject.org/glossary/directory-authority/). Directory authorities are special-purpose relays that maintain a list of currently-running relays and periodically publish a consensus together with the other directory authorities. Directory authorities are run mostly by trusted volunteers from our community. They rely on recommendations from the Network Health team to evaluate and address malicious relays, but they only reject a potentially malicious relay if the majority of directory authorities agree to do so.
## KAX17 and failures in the past
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