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Commit 29299860 authored by Nick Mathewson's avatar Nick Mathewson 🍜
Browse files

Actually add HowToReview.txt

parent 609c1e88
How to review a patch
=====================
Some folks have said that they'd like to review patches more often, but they
don't know how.
So, here are a bunch of things to check for when reviewing a patch!
Note that if you can't do every one of these, that doesn't mean you can't do
a good review! Just make it clear what you checked for and what you didn't.
Top-level smell-checks
----------------------
(Difficulty: easy)
Does it compile with --enable-gcc-warnings?
Does 'make check-spaces' pass?
Does it have a reasonable amount of tests? Do they pass? Do they leak
memory?
Do all the new functions, global variables, types, and structure members have
documentation?
Do all the the functions, global variables, types, and structure members with
modified behavior have modified documentation?
Do all the new torrc options have documentation?
If this changes Tor's behavior on the wire, is there a design proposal?
Let's look at the code!
-----------------------
Does the code conform to CodingStandards.txt?
Does the code leak memory?
If two or more pointers ever point to the same object, is it clear which
pointer "owns" the object?
Are all allocated resources freed?
Are all pointers that should be const, const?
Are #defines used for 'magic' numbers?
Can you understand what the code is trying to do?
Can you convince yourself that the code really does that?
Is there duplicated code that could be turned into a function?
Let's look at the documentation!
--------------------------------
Does the documentation confirm to CodingStandards.txt?
Does it make sense?
Can you predict what the function will do from its documentation?
Let's think about security!
---------------------------
If there are any arrays, buffers, are you 100% sure that they cannot
overflow?
If there is any integer math, can it overflow or underflow?
If there are any allocations, are you sure there are corresponding
deallocations?
Is there a safer pattern that could be used in any case?
Have they used one of the Forbidden Functions?
(Also see your favorite secure C programming guides.)
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